THE GUARDIAN 🔵 Minister warns of ‘stain on society’ as figures show 1.5m children affected by two-child benefit cap – UK politics live – Shango Media
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THE GUARDIAN 🔵 Minister warns of ‘stain on society’ as figures show 1.5m children affected by two-child benefit cap – UK politics live

Labour policy to abolish the cap.

Liz Kendall, appointed to the role last week, said:

Too many children are growing up in poverty and this is a stain on our society. We will work to give every child the best start in life by delivering our manifesto commitment to implement an ambitious strategy to reduce child poverty. I will hold critical meetings with charities and experts next week to get this urgent work under way.

The figures come as the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) said its survey of 560 families hit by the policy reveals “the deep suffering and deprivation it’s causing”.

Almost all of them (93%) said the policy had affected their ability to pay for food, while 82% said it meant they struggle to cover gas or electricity bills. Almost half (45%) of respondents said they struggled to pay their rent or mortgage because of the policy while (46%) told of struggles to manage childcare costs.

The Resolution Foundation has calculated that abolishing the two-child limit would cost the Government somewhere between £2.5bn and £3.6bn but said it would be one of the most efficient ways to drive down child poverty rates”, estimating that if abolished it could lift 490,000 children out of poverty.

PA Media reports figures published on Thursday by the Department for Work and Pensions showed there were 1.6 million children living in households affected by the policy as of April this year, up from 1.5 million to April 2023.

Of these, 52% of children were in households with three children, 29% in households with four children, and 19% are in households with five or more children.

Before becoming prime minister, Keir Starmer said he would ditch the two-child limit “in an ideal world” but added that “we haven’t got the resources to do it at the moment”.

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here.

They list these as the key points included:

  • Seven years after the introduction of the two-child limit, there are almost 1.6 million children in 440,000 families affected by the policy. These families are missing out on up to £3,455 a year per child

  • The majority of families affected by the policy are living in poverty, despite 59 per cent of these families having one or both parents in paid work

  • Affected families report not being able to provide for children’s basic needs, including food, clothing and heating. The policy also means families struggle to pay for housing and childcare

  • The policy affects every area of children’s lives. Parents report that children’s education, mental health, and learning and development are all negatively affected by the two-child limit. Children are also missing out on the “every day” experiences of childhood such as days out with their family, being able to go on holiday, or having the occasional treat such as an ice-cream

  • Abolishing the two-child limit is the most cost-effective way to reduce child poverty, and the most urgent action the government must take to reduce child poverty. It would lift 300,000 children out of poverty and mean 700,000 children are in less deep poverty, making a significant difference to the lives of over a million children at a cost of £1.7bn

PA Media reports that Rev Martyn Snow, Bishop of Leicester, said: “The testimonies in this report remind us that the two-child limit continues to affect the wellbeing and life chances of too many children and families in this country. Abolishing this unfair policy is essential if we are to turn the tide on poverty and ensure that every child is supported to flourish in all areas of life.”

Chief Executive of Child Poverty Action Group Alison Garnham is quoted as saying: “Children are losing their life chances to the two-child limit now. They can’t wait for the new Government to align every star before the policy is scrapped. Keir Starmer came to office pledging a bold, ambitious child poverty-reduction plan and there’s no way to deliver on that promise without scrapping the two-child limit, and fast.”

over here.

Labour policy to abolish the cap.

Liz Kendall, appointed to the role last week, said:

Too many children are growing up in poverty and this is a stain on our society. We will work to give every child the best start in life by delivering our manifesto commitment to implement an ambitious strategy to reduce child poverty. I will hold critical meetings with charities and experts next week to get this urgent work under way.

The figures come as the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) said its survey of 560 families hit by the policy reveals “the deep suffering and deprivation it’s causing”.

Almost all of them (93%) said the policy had affected their ability to pay for food, while 82% said it meant they struggle to cover gas or electricity bills. Almost half (45%) of respondents said they struggled to pay their rent or mortgage because of the policy while (46%) told of struggles to manage childcare costs.

The Resolution Foundation has calculated that abolishing the two-child limit would cost the Government somewhere between £2.5bn and £3.6bn but said it would be one of the most efficient ways to drive down child poverty rates”, estimating that if abolished it could lift 490,000 children out of poverty.

PA Media reports figures published on Thursday by the Department for Work and Pensions showed there were 1.6 million children living in households affected by the policy as of April this year, up from 1.5 million to April 2023.

Of these, 52% of children were in households with three children, 29% in households with four children, and 19% are in households with five or more children.

Before becoming prime minister, Keir Starmer said he would ditch the two-child limit “in an ideal world” but added that “we haven’t got the resources to do it at the moment”.

GB News the pulpit of choice.

Former MP Andrea Jenkyns told viewers of the channel she was supporting Suella Braverman or Priti Patel to be the next leader.

She said of Kemi Badenoch that she was “just a party stooge. She voted for all Theresa May’s deals. She voted for more Net Zero. Look how she behaved with Boris, immaturely in those text messages, trying to get people to resign.”

With a hint of conspiracy theory in the air, she continued about Badenoch “Kemi was a London Assembly Member. Why is there nothing online? Why does her internet history seem to have been wiped prior to Brexit? That’s what I’d like to know.”

Jenkyns added “I think what we’ve seen over the last 18 months really is that we need some red meat policies. Look how people went to Reform,” and said “I certainly don’t want Victoria Atkins. I don’t like her whatsoever. She’s just so damned rude, I’m afraid.”

Jacob Rees-Mogg has also popped up with his tuppence worth, arguing the party needs to move further to the right, rather than to the centre. He said:

Reform merely connected with the voters we failed to inspire. It should surely be number one on our agenda to win Reform voters back into the Tory party.

And we don’t win elections from the centre. Any attempt to indulge that narrative that our only problem was drifting too far to the right is fanciful.

If the next leader takes that view, he or she should expect to lose even more seats.

It is unclear the extent to which the next leader of the Conservative party will be open to advice from former MPs who lost their seats last week.

If the Tory leadership contest is held under the existing rules, then neither Rees-Mogg nor Jenkyns will be in a position to vote on a new leader until the proposition is put to party members for a final vote between two candidates that have been selected by those who were elected to be MPs last week.

wrote:

The NHS and my department have been instructed to hand him whatever information he needs.

It is going to take time to turn the NHS around – we were honest about that before the election. Sticking-plasters will not be enough to heal it. It will require fundamental reform.

We have pledged a ten-year plan to make the NHS fit for the future, which we will be consulting patients, experts and staff on soon.

The NHS has been wrecked. This investigation will be the survey, before we draw up plans to rebuild it anew, so it can be there for all of us when we need it, once again.

rise by £94 on average in England and Wales over the next five years, Ofwat also announced that it was putting Thames Water into special measures due to “significant issues”.

Nigel Farage will not be allowed to repeat his EU parliament rudeness as an MP

UK economy returned to growth in May in the last weeks of Rishi Sunak’s government.

PA Media report Trott said:

Today’s figures show that the steps we put in place whilst in government have strengthened the economy.

These figures also prove Labour are inheriting an economy turning a corner, after the many difficult decisions we took in government.

We will keep Labour to the promises made in the campaign not to raise taxes on working people. As Rachel Reeves, the new Chancellor, herself recognised, the books were open.

Part of the Conservative’s election campaign was a press conference where Trott produced a dossier about so-called “Labour tax traps”, suggesting the party had “18 secret taxes” planned if it came to power.

Today in Focus – The Conservative party: rows, resignations … and a tilt right?

Wes Streeting has announced in an article in the Sun.

He wrote:

It’s clear to anyone who works in or uses the NHS that it is broken. Unlike the last government, we are not looking for excuses. I am certainly not going to blame NHS staff, who bust a gut for their patients.

This government is going to be honest about the challenges facing us, and serious about solving them.

Honesty is the best policy, and this report will provide patients, staff and myself with a full and frank assessment of the state of the NHS, warts and all.

Streeting said the investigation would be led by the former health minister Lord Ara Darzi, who served under Gordon Brown between 2007 and 2009.

Health is devolved. It was unclear from Streeting’s article in the Sun whether he was only referring to England, or whether it was to be an over-arching review that would take into account health outcomes and spending in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

an analysis piece on the forthcoming second auction of Telegraph Media Group.

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